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The Beth Chatto Gardens – Almost a Final Pond Look!

A few nice How to grow ferns images I found:

The Beth Chatto Gardens – Almost a Final Pond Look!
How to grow ferns

Image by antonychammond
One of the greats of British gardening, Beth Chatto OBE has entered the realm of national treasuredom. Plants-woman, designer, author, 10-time gold-medal winner at Chelsea, holder of the Royal Horticultural Society’s Victoria Medal of Honour and, of course, the owner of the celebrated Beth Chatto Gardens at Elmstead Market, near Colchester, in Essex – her horticultural skills seem boundless. With the concept of “right plant, right place” – in other words, put a plant in conditions close to its natural habitat and it will thrive without help – running as a thread throughout her career, she has inspired a generation of gardeners to take their lead from nature.

The garden has been the inspiration for many of her influential books, including The Dry Garden (1978), The Damp Garden (1992) and Beth Chatto’s Gravel Garden (2000). It was created on land that was previously part of a fruit farm, owned by her late husband, Andrew, 14 years her senior, whom she married in 1943. “We met during the war,” she says. “I was a schoolgirl of about 17, considering going to college.”

A scholarly man, who died in 1999 after suffering from emphysema for 25 years, Andrew devoted much of his life to research into plant habitats. Chatto says it was he who inspired her interest in gardening and refers to him frequently, modestly deferring to his superior knowledge. “He’s such an important influence in my life,” she says. “My parents were keen, but they had a conventional garden, using mostly cultivars.”

The couple lived initially in his parents’ in Colchester, but in the late 1950s moved to a modernist house they’d built on the edge of the farm – where Chatto still lives today. Even inside, the garden is a constant presence. Large windows frame views and vignettes of the planting on every side and invite a tapestry of textures, colours and shapes into the house.

Chatto credits her husband almost entirely for her success. “My two daughters were teenagers before I began to think about making a business,” she says. “Andrew had looked after us and given me the security and freedom to experiment.” Her husband’s failing health and the trials of running a fruit farm concentrated her mind on developing the garden commercially, though what we see today took time to emerge.

“For the first seven or eight years, much of the land was a wilderness,” she recalls. Yet there were assets, too, not least a rare natural water source in the drought-prone east of Essex, where rainfall can be as little as 20in a year. “There were a few fine 300-year-old oaks and a spring-fed ditch ran through the hollow.” Today, the ornamental gardens cover about five acres; a further 10 are occupied by the nursery, which opened in 1967, and working areas.

Finding water was not the only challenge. “There was land that was so dry, the native weeds curled up and died. That eventually became my gravel garden,” she says. This she created in 1991, on the site of a car park. Apart from watering in the young, drought-tolerant plants during the first year, she has never artificially irrigated it.

Chatto has a knack for turning problem areas into an asset, and there are several distinct areas in the garden, each requiring a different approach. The large water gardens are dominated by a series of ponds surrounded by bog plants and swathes of lush grass. A long, shady walk runs parallel to one of the boundaries. Here, shade-tolerant planting – including ferns, tiarella and pulmonaria – carpet the ground beneath oaks and other specimen trees added by Chatto. By contrast, the gravel area is a mass of sun-loving perennials, with asters, rudbeckias and sedums glowing through hazy grasses.

The garden may have started out to give pleasure to a family, but it has developed into a self-contained horticultural powerhouse, attracting visitors from all over the world – about 40,000 a year. “It’s like sowing an acorn, which is my symbol,” says Chatto. “I have an acorn and an oak tree on a weather vane, which was a wonderful present from my staff.” Incredibly, it is tended by only one full-time and four part-time gardeners and volunteers – many of whom are foreign students. Chatto remains resolutely hands-on and is keen to pass on the knowledge she has gained through experience.

Chatto uses grasses brilliantly, and was doing so long before it became fashionable. She creates seemingly effortless but thoroughly satisfying combinations. Therein lies her genius – there may be others out there with an equal understanding of plants, but nobody else has her eye. Shape, scale, proportion, texture, colour – all are balanced with the skill of a plate-spinner.

She also factors in horticultural considerations – how big a plant will get, how fast or slowly it will grow, what conditions it needs to thrive and how it is maintained. The result is a garden that works on every level – practical, horticultural and aesthetic – with layer upon layer of carefully placed plants, as enticing asmillefeuillepastry. It all seems entirely uncontrived, but, on closer inspection, one notices geometric lines and angles. The big picture is built up gradually, with small groupings of three or more plants forming a satisfying melange of verticals and horizontals, and fluffy and solid plants. “I need the trees and shrubs to form a background, to paint the sky and lead the eye upwards towards the clouds,” Chatto explains. “Then one adds the embroidery, which I enjoy so much.” Nothing is allowed to get out of hand, but stagnation is not an option, either. “A garden is not a picture hanging on a wall,” she says. “It changes not only from hour to hour, week to week or month to month, but from year to year.”

Chatto has certainly noticed the effects of climate change. Drought is nothing new in her part of the world, where (the past two years aside) there is sometimes no rain for up to 10 weeks in the summer. “The most interesting change is the lack of cold weather,” she says. “Only 10 years ago, we had icicles hanging down, and when the children were little, they used to skate. Now we hardly have enough ice to bear a duck.” From an article by Rachel de Thame

Please visit www.bethchatto.co.uk/ for further information about this inspirational gardener and garden.

The Beth Chatto Gardens – Beauty on Reflection
How to grow ferns

Image by antonychammond
One of the greats of British gardening, Beth Chatto OBE has entered the realm of national treasuredom. Plants-woman, designer, author, 10-time gold-medal winner at Chelsea, holder of the Royal Horticultural Society’s Victoria Medal of Honour and, of course, the owner of the celebrated Beth Chatto Gardens at Elmstead Market, near Colchester, in Essex – her horticultural skills seem boundless. With the concept of “right plant, right place” – in other words, put a plant in conditions close to its natural habitat and it will thrive without help – running as a thread throughout her career, she has inspired a generation of gardeners to take their lead from nature.

The garden has been the inspiration for many of her influential books, including The Dry Garden (1978), The Damp Garden (1992) and Beth Chatto’s Gravel Garden (2000). It was created on land that was previously part of a fruit farm, owned by her late husband, Andrew, 14 years her senior, whom she married in 1943. “We met during the war,” she says. “I was a schoolgirl of about 17, considering going to college.”

A scholarly man, who died in 1999 after suffering from emphysema for 25 years, Andrew devoted much of his life to research into plant habitats. Chatto says it was he who inspired her interest in gardening and refers to him frequently, modestly deferring to his superior knowledge. “He’s such an important influence in my life,” she says. “My parents were keen, but they had a conventional garden, using mostly cultivars.”

The couple lived initially in his parents’ in Colchester, but in the late 1950s moved to a modernist house they’d built on the edge of the farm – where Chatto still lives today. Even inside, the garden is a constant presence. Large windows frame views and vignettes of the planting on every side and invite a tapestry of textures, colours and shapes into the house.

Chatto credits her husband almost entirely for her success. “My two daughters were teenagers before I began to think about making a business,” she says. “Andrew had looked after us and given me the security and freedom to experiment.” Her husband’s failing health and the trials of running a fruit farm concentrated her mind on developing the garden commercially, though what we see today took time to emerge.

“For the first seven or eight years, much of the land was a wilderness,” she recalls. Yet there were assets, too, not least a rare natural water source in the drought-prone east of Essex, where rainfall can be as little as 20in a year. “There were a few fine 300-year-old oaks and a spring-fed ditch ran through the hollow.” Today, the ornamental gardens cover about five acres; a further 10 are occupied by the nursery, which opened in 1967, and working areas.

Finding water was not the only challenge. “There was land that was so dry, the native weeds curled up and died. That eventually became my gravel garden,” she says. This she created in 1991, on the site of a car park. Apart from watering in the young, drought-tolerant plants during the first year, she has never artificially irrigated it.

Chatto has a knack for turning problem areas into an asset, and there are several distinct areas in the garden, each requiring a different approach. The large water gardens are dominated by a series of ponds surrounded by bog plants and swathes of lush grass. A long, shady walk runs parallel to one of the boundaries. Here, shade-tolerant planting – including ferns, tiarella and pulmonaria – carpet the ground beneath oaks and other specimen trees added by Chatto. By contrast, the gravel area is a mass of sun-loving perennials, with asters, rudbeckias and sedums glowing through hazy grasses.

The garden may have started out to give pleasure to a family, but it has developed into a self-contained horticultural powerhouse, attracting visitors from all over the world – about 40,000 a year. “It’s like sowing an acorn, which is my symbol,” says Chatto. “I have an acorn and an oak tree on a weather vane, which was a wonderful present from my staff.” Incredibly, it is tended by only one full-time and four part-time gardeners and volunteers – many of whom are foreign students. Chatto remains resolutely hands-on and is keen to pass on the knowledge she has gained through experience.

Chatto uses grasses brilliantly, and was doing so long before it became fashionable. She creates seemingly effortless but thoroughly satisfying combinations. Therein lies her genius – there may be others out there with an equal understanding of plants, but nobody else has her eye. Shape, scale, proportion, texture, colour – all are balanced with the skill of a plate-spinner.

She also factors in horticultural considerations – how big a plant will get, how fast or slowly it will grow, what conditions it needs to thrive and how it is maintained. The result is a garden that works on every level – practical, horticultural and aesthetic – with layer upon layer of carefully placed plants, as enticing asmillefeuillepastry. It all seems entirely uncontrived, but, on closer inspection, one notices geometric lines and angles. The big picture is built up gradually, with small groupings of three or more plants forming a satisfying melange of verticals and horizontals, and fluffy and solid plants. “I need the trees and shrubs to form a background, to paint the sky and lead the eye upwards towards the clouds,” Chatto explains. “Then one adds the embroidery, which I enjoy so much.” Nothing is allowed to get out of hand, but stagnation is not an option, either. “A garden is not a picture hanging on a wall,” she says. “It changes not only from hour to hour, week to week or month to month, but from year to year.”

Chatto has certainly noticed the effects of climate change. Drought is nothing new in her part of the world, where (the past two years aside) there is sometimes no rain for up to 10 weeks in the summer. “The most interesting change is the lack of cold weather,” she says. “Only 10 years ago, we had icicles hanging down, and when the children were little, they used to skate. Now we hardly have enough ice to bear a duck.” From an article by Rachel de Thame

Please visit www.bethchatto.co.uk/ for further information about this inspirational gardener and garden.

The Needs of a Plant (song for kids)

THE NEEDS OF A PLANT (see counterpart- “The Needs of an Animal”) For a plant to stay alive (echo) It needs 5 things- I would not lie (echo) It needs water so it can grow (echo) And it needs soil- just like so (echo) Plants needs space- they can’t be tight (echo) The sun helps plants by giving light (echo) Don’t forget to give plants air (echo) Repeat the needs if you dare (echo) NEED 1- Water! NEED 2- Soil! NEED 3- Space! NEED 4- Light! NEED 5- Air! A PLANT!!!!!!
Video Rating: 4 / 5

Anubias Java Ferns | Aquarium Ferns

Anubias Java Ferns with rhizome roots. Looking at rhizomes

Anubias Java Ferns for Aquariums Great Video

Vibran-Sea Fountain Fern Silk-Style Aquarium Plant, Extra-Large 18-19 tall, Green

anubias java ferns

  • Safe for aquariums and terrariums
  • Soft leaves sway in water current
  • Weighted resin base with no metal stems
  • Full & bushy floral clusters

Vibran-Sea Fountain Fern hand dyed silk-style aquarium & terrarium plant, Extra-Large 18-19″ tall, Green

anubias java ferns

List Price: $ 11.99

Price:

Anubias Java Ferns have rhizome roots. This means they dont need to be under the gravel. Anubias and java fern love having themselves tied to a rock or piece of wood. rhizome roots are important to the growth of a health plant.
Video Rating: 4 / 5

Our first release, The Ferns at Mt. Cuba Center, will give you an overview of some of the best garden ferns we use. Learn about native ferns in the garden, their textures, landscape use, and companion plants. Discover the tricks of fern culture, why to grow them, how to plant them and their maintenance requirements. Explore the secrets of fern biology and their lifecycle. Use our fern glossary to understand the terminology. Delve into our favorite 26 native ferns (both common and uncommon) with plant information sheets or watch a video guide for each plant. Enjoy a treasure trove of 63 pages of printable handouts and delight in our picturesque garden video. Learn where to buy ferns and discover suggested books and websites. Once you register and enroll in the class, you have 45 days to enjoy the fern resources.
Video Rating: 0 / 5

KollerCraft AQUARIUS AquaView 360 Aquarium Kit with LED Light – 3-Gallon

anubias java ferns for aquariums

  • This attractive tank will brighten any room
  • The aquarium kit features LED lighting (which includes 6 switchable color selections)
  • Kit includes a full hood, under-gravel filter, tubing and air pump
  • The unique hood turns the same color as the LED light
  • This clear seamless aquarium offers 360-degree panoramic viewing

Aquarius AQV360H3 AquaView 360 3-gallon with LED Light, Pump and under-gravel filter. Cylinder Shape. KollerCraft is highly regarded for supplying superior quality, innovative pet products and reliable service. This stylish 3-gallon aquarium kit comes with undertank LED lighting.

anubias java ferns for aquariums

List Price: $ 33.99

Price:

Fluval Chi Aquarium Kit, 5-Gallon

anubias java ferns for aquariums

  • 5-gallon aquatic aquarium that provides you with a calming and soothing atmosphere
  • Easy to set up and maintain
  • One plug for the integrated filtration system and powerful LED lighting system
  • Decor tray provides the opportunity change out plants and decorative objects for optimal appearance

The Fluval Chi 5-gallon tank delivers an appealing aquarium, making the ordinary truly extraordinary. It was designed to radiate positive energy throughout any home or office. Its elegant yet subtle lines and harmonious balance of light and sounds provide a stylish, contemporary decor piece to any setting. Inspired by the Chinese Chi philosophy, Fluval Chi helps stimulate the essence of Chi-inspired values such as life, health, prosperity and everything that is positive. The calming aquatic sett

anubias java ferns for aquariums

List Price: $ 65.99

Price:

Umbra FishHotel Aquarium

anubias java ferns for aquariums

  • Stackable aquarium with striking modern design
  • Glass bowl with removable ABS plastic façade and asymmetrical windows
  • Can stack other FishHotels for tall condo-like appearance
  • Detachable outer shell can be painted
  • 7.5 x 7.5 x 8 inches; 5 pounds

The Umbra FishHotel is an award-winning modern home for your finned friends. Modeled after a contemporary condominium, this reinvented aquarium features a sleek white shell with assymetrical “windows.” Individual units can be stacked to create a condo effect. Glass bowl is removable for cleaning.

anubias java ferns for aquariums

List Price: $ 38.50

Price:

Grow Ferns Nice How To Grow Ferns photos

Grow Ferns

A few nice How to grow ferns images I found:

Inside the Botanical Building,Balboa Park,San Diego,California
grow ferns

Image by **Mary**
Here you can see how the sun filters inside this beautiful structure of redwood slats. It is the perfect situation for many plants, including lots of orchids and ferns to grow well.
All the plants and flowers are well labelled.
There is even a herb garden where you are encouraged to ‘taste’ the different herbs.
Also along some of the sides and in the corners of the building you can see waterfalls with pools filled with water plants.

The Botanical Building in Balboa Park, San Diego, at 250 feet long by 75 feet wide and 60 feet tall, was the largest wood lath structure in the world when it was built in 1915 for the Panama-California Exposition. The Botanical Building, located on the Prado, west of the Museum of Art, contains about 2,100 permanent tropical plants along with changing seasonal flowers.

OjaiNewYears-35
How to grow ferns

Image by lauryshark
There was a small section of forest that had obviously burned in the last few years. This fern was growing up out of the base of a tree that had burned. It’s encouraging to see how life inevitably struggles back above ground.

Fairy Grotto
How to grow ferns

Image by Kristi Herbert
Fern-filled woodland nestling against the limestone cliffs and growing out of great boulders and stones. Just out of shot and arm’s reach was an assortment of rubbish – crisp packets, empty beer and cider cans. It never ceases to amaze how some people can come to the most stunningly beautiful places and leave them looking like a student’s bedroom.

Ferns & How To Grow Them by Woolson, G A

How to grow ferns eBay auctions you should keep an eye on:



Nice How To Grow Ferns photos

Check out these How to grow ferns images:

The Beth Chatto Gardens – How Green is My Valley!
How to grow ferns

Image by antonychammond
One of the greats of British gardening, Beth Chatto OBE has entered the realm of national treasuredom. Plants-woman, designer, author, 10-time gold-medal winner at Chelsea, holder of the Royal Horticultural Society’s Victoria Medal of Honour and, of course, the owner of the celebrated Beth Chatto Gardens at Elmstead Market, near Colchester, in Essex – her horticultural skills seem boundless. With the concept of “right plant, right place” – in other words, put a plant in conditions close to its natural habitat and it will thrive without help – running as a thread throughout her career, she has inspired a generation of gardeners to take their lead from nature.

The garden has been the inspiration for many of her influential books, including The Dry Garden (1978), The Damp Garden (1992) and Beth Chatto’s Gravel Garden (2000). It was created on land that was previously part of a fruit farm, owned by her late husband, Andrew, 14 years her senior, whom she married in 1943. “We met during the war,” she says. “I was a schoolgirl of about 17, considering going to college.”

A scholarly man, who died in 1999 after suffering from emphysema for 25 years, Andrew devoted much of his life to research into plant habitats. Chatto says it was he who inspired her interest in gardening and refers to him frequently, modestly deferring to his superior knowledge. “He’s such an important influence in my life,” she says. “My parents were keen, but they had a conventional garden, using mostly cultivars.”

The couple lived initially in his parents’ in Colchester, but in the late 1950s moved to a modernist house they’d built on the edge of the farm – where Chatto still lives today. Even inside, the garden is a constant presence. Large windows frame views and vignettes of the planting on every side and invite a tapestry of textures, colours and shapes into the house.

Chatto credits her husband almost entirely for her success. “My two daughters were teenagers before I began to think about making a business,” she says. “Andrew had looked after us and given me the security and freedom to experiment.” Her husband’s failing health and the trials of running a fruit farm concentrated her mind on developing the garden commercially, though what we see today took time to emerge.

“For the first seven or eight years, much of the land was a wilderness,” she recalls. Yet there were assets, too, not least a rare natural water source in the drought-prone east of Essex, where rainfall can be as little as 20in a year. “There were a few fine 300-year-old oaks and a spring-fed ditch ran through the hollow.” Today, the ornamental gardens cover about five acres; a further 10 are occupied by the nursery, which opened in 1967, and working areas.

Finding water was not the only challenge. “There was land that was so dry, the native weeds curled up and died. That eventually became my gravel garden,” she says. This she created in 1991, on the site of a car park. Apart from watering in the young, drought-tolerant plants during the first year, she has never artificially irrigated it.

Chatto has a knack for turning problem areas into an asset, and there are several distinct areas in the garden, each requiring a different approach. The large water gardens are dominated by a series of ponds surrounded by bog plants and swathes of lush grass. A long, shady walk runs parallel to one of the boundaries. Here, shade-tolerant planting – including ferns, tiarella and pulmonaria – carpet the ground beneath oaks and other specimen trees added by Chatto. By contrast, the gravel area is a mass of sun-loving perennials, with asters, rudbeckias and sedums glowing through hazy grasses.

The garden may have started out to give pleasure to a family, but it has developed into a self-contained horticultural powerhouse, attracting visitors from all over the world – about 40,000 a year. “It’s like sowing an acorn, which is my symbol,” says Chatto. “I have an acorn and an oak tree on a weather vane, which was a wonderful present from my staff.” Incredibly, it is tended by only one full-time and four part-time gardeners and volunteers – many of whom are foreign students. Chatto remains resolutely hands-on and is keen to pass on the knowledge she has gained through experience.

Chatto uses grasses brilliantly, and was doing so long before it became fashionable. She creates seemingly effortless but thoroughly satisfying combinations. Therein lies her genius – there may be others out there with an equal understanding of plants, but nobody else has her eye. Shape, scale, proportion, texture, colour – all are balanced with the skill of a plate-spinner.

She also factors in horticultural considerations – how big a plant will get, how fast or slowly it will grow, what conditions it needs to thrive and how it is maintained. The result is a garden that works on every level – practical, horticultural and aesthetic – with layer upon layer of carefully placed plants, as enticing asmillefeuillepastry. It all seems entirely uncontrived, but, on closer inspection, one notices geometric lines and angles. The big picture is built up gradually, with small groupings of three or more plants forming a satisfying melange of verticals and horizontals, and fluffy and solid plants. “I need the trees and shrubs to form a background, to paint the sky and lead the eye upwards towards the clouds,” Chatto explains. “Then one adds the embroidery, which I enjoy so much.” Nothing is allowed to get out of hand, but stagnation is not an option, either. “A garden is not a picture hanging on a wall,” she says. “It changes not only from hour to hour, week to week or month to month, but from year to year.”

Chatto has certainly noticed the effects of climate change. Drought is nothing new in her part of the world, where (the past two years aside) there is sometimes no rain for up to 10 weeks in the summer. “The most interesting change is the lack of cold weather,” she says. “Only 10 years ago, we had icicles hanging down, and when the children were little, they used to skate. Now we hardly have enough ice to bear a duck.” From an article by Rachel de Thame

Please visit www.bethchatto.co.uk/ for further information about this inspirational gardener and garden.

Canopy Fern
How to grow ferns

Image by shichahn
Along the creek grow the giant tree ferns, which really are ferns the size of trees and reach all the way up to the canopy some 150 feet above. This photo was not actually shot in black and white; this is simply how the camera processes the color based on the natural lighting.

misty ferns
How to grow ferns

Image by angela7dreams
"No matter how high the tree grows, the leaves always return to the root."
~Malay proverb

at Mt. Kinabalu National Park, Sabah, Malaysia

Terrarium

A few nice How to grow ferns images I found:

Terrarium
How to grow ferns

Image by ex.libris
Learn how to make your own terrarium here: thelittlebig.wordpress.com/2010/11/03/how-to-create-a-ter…

Small now, but they will grow. If I put them in and they were larger, they would quickly outgrow the terrarium.

Over grow window
How to grow ferns

Image by ashley BALSAM baz
I spent the day down the woods fixing the nursery pump and had to walk past these old buildings. How this must have been 30 or 40 years ago.

Fern

Check out these How to grow ferns images:

Fern
How to grow ferns

Image by Fernando X. Sanchez
Another test with my OM 50mm. I really like how during this time of year, trees get filled with fern all around. My parents have ferns back and home, is a really nice plant if you take the time to grow it on it’s own pot.

Tallahassee, Florida. April 2008

fern growing on knobble.
How to grow ferns

Image by fuzzy logic!
I really want to know what the crap that knobbly thing is, and how it grew there, and then how there is enough nutrients for that little fern to get a foothold in there!

Ferns
How to grow ferns

Image by Roj
I took this photo to show how the ferns have grown back since the fire in March 2010.

1935 AMERICAN FERNS: HOW TO KNOW GROW AND USE THEM

Most popular How to grow ferns eBay auctions:


Fougère Osmundastrum Cinnamomeum / Osmonde cannelle / Cinnamon fern

Fougère Osmundastrum Cinnamomeum / Osmonde cannelle / Cinnamon fern
propagate orchids

Image by Charl de Mille-Isles
En bordure de la swamp. Une autre sorte de fougère s’apprête à surgir de sa boule.

Wikipedia Osmundastrum cinnamomeum, the Cinnamon Fern, is a species of eusporangiate fern in the family Osmundaceae. It is native to the Americas and eastern Asia, growing in swamps, bogs and moist woodlands.

Close-up of the pinnae of a sterile frond
In North America it occurs from southern Labrador west to Ontario, and south through the eastern United States to eastern Mexico and the West Indies; in South America it occurs west to Peru and south to Paraguay. In Asia it occurs from southeastern Siberia south through Japan, Korea, China and Taiwan to Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam.

Characteristics

Osmundastrum cinnamomeum is a deciduous herbaceous plant which produces separate fertile and sterile fronds. The sterile fronds are spreading, 30-150 cm tall and 15-20 cm broad, pinnate, with pinnae 5-10 cm long and 2-2.5 cm broad, deeply lobed (so the fronds are nearly, but not quite, bipinnate). The fertile spore-bearing fronds are erect and shorter, 20-45 cm tall; they become cinnamon-colored, which gives the species its name. The fertile leaves appear first; their green color slowly becomes brown as the season progresses and the spores are dropped. The spore-bearing stems persist after the sterile fronds are killed by frost, until the next season. The spores must develop within a few weeks or fail.

The Osmundastrum cinnamomeum fern forms huge clonal colonies in swampy areas. These ferns form massive rootstocks with densely-matted, wiry roots. This root mass is an excellent substrate for many epiphytal plants. They are often harvested as osmunda fiber and used horticulturally, especially in propagating and growing orchids. Cinnamon Ferns do not actually produce cinnamon.

Classification

Traditionally, this plant has been classified as Osmunda cinnamomea L.. However, recent genetic and morphological evidence (Metzgar et al. 2008; Jud et al. 2008) clearly demonstrate that the cinnamon fern is a sister species to the entire rest of the living Osmundaceae. Cladistically, it is either necessary then to include all species of the Osmundaceae, including Todea and Leptopteris in the genus Osmunda, or else it is necessary to segregate the genus Osmundastrum. O. cinnamomeum is the sole living species in the genus,[1] although it is possible that some additional fossils should be assigned to Osmundastrum.[2]

Formerly, some authors included the interrupted fern, Osmunda claytoniana, in the genus or section Osmundastrum, because of its gross apparent morphological similarities. However, detailed morphology and genetic analysis have proven that the interrupted fern is actually a true Osmunda. This is borne out by the fact that it is known to hybridize with the royal fern, Osmunda regalis to produce Osmunda × ruggii in a family in which hybrids are rare, while Osmundastrum cinnamomeum has no known hybrids.

Osmundastrum cinnamomeum is considered a living fossil because it has been identified in the geologic record as far back as 75 million years ago.[2]

The Asian and American populations of cinnamon fern are generally considered to be varieties of a single species, but some botanists classify them as separate species.[1]

Je crois qu’il s’agit de fronde fertile dOsmonde cannelle, très différentes des frondes stériles de mes autres photos
propagate orchids

Image by Charl de Mille-Isles
Wikipedia Osmundastrum cinnamomeum is a deciduous herbaceous plant which produces separate fertile and sterile fronds. The sterile fronds are spreading, 30-150 cm tall and 15-20 cm broad, pinnate, with pinnae 5-10 cm long and 2-2.5 cm broad, deeply lobed (so the fronds are nearly, but not quite, bipinnate). The fertile spore-bearing fronds are erect and shorter, 20-45 cm tall; they become cinnamon-colored, which gives the species its name. The fertile leaves appear first; their green color slowly becomes brown as the season progresses and the spores are dropped. The spore-bearing stems persist after the sterile fronds are killed by frost, until the next season. The spores must develop within a few weeks or fail.

The Osmundastrum cinnamomeum fern forms huge clonal colonies in swampy areas. These ferns form massive rootstocks with densely-matted, wiry roots. This root mass is an excellent substrate for many epiphytal plants. They are often harvested as osmunda fiber and used horticulturally, especially in propagating and growing orchids. Cinnamon Ferns do not actually produce cinnamon.

vandaceous plantlets
propagate orchids

Image by gorgeoux
more gorgeouxness

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